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X-Ray Mag #23

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X-Ray Mag #23

April 22, 2008 - 20:04
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In X-RAY MAG issue #23, Mark Webster takes on a tour through the fascinating underwater world off Cornwall, England. We talk with Pascal Bernabé for insights into his achievements in deep diving. Science editor, Michael Symes, investigates locomotion of sea creatures, and we look at Hammerhead sharks and their unique head shape. Harald Apelt brings us to another pearl in the Mediterranean -- beautiful, historic Croatia. Kurt Amsler discusses proper workflow in digital photography. Rebreather pro, Cedric Verdier, gets us up to speed on physical fitness for divers and DIR for rebreather divers. Girldiver Cindy Ross discusses sunscreen and gives us the skinny on sunrays and skin cancer. We meet the Bubbling Reefs of Denmark, and a diverse portfolio of ocean art from artists around the world tops it all off. Plus the news -- on marine ecology, discoveries, ship wrecks, conservation, equipment, travel, divers, record breakers, books and films, turtles, sharks, whales, jellyfish and more...

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Main features in this issue include:

10 Q & A’s About DIR Rebreather

October 13, 2011 - 23:32
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page 16

What is DIRrebreather?

Since its implementation a few years ago, the Doing It Right (DIR) philosophy has gained in popularity not only in the cave diving community and amongst technical divers, but it has also spread to the recreational diving community across the world.

However, almost clandestinely, some CCR divers and Instructors decided to found what is now called DIRrebreather and to set up logical and simple rules, so we could apply the DIR principles to CCR diving. We just dreamt about bringing together the best of both worlds!

Cornwall - Cornish reefs

October 13, 2011 - 23:23
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page 31

Global diving travel has become increasingly easy over the last decade or so, providing easy access to a growing number of tropical and exotic destinations. So, for many divers residing in cooler climates or new to the sport, it is tempting to look only towards these warm distant destinations and perhaps ignore the wealth of marine life on their own doorstep.

The south west peninsula and county of Cornwall is physically remote from the remainder of the British Isles and also has a rich history full of myth, legend, smuggling and illicit ship wrecking.

Debugging the sunscreen factor

October 13, 2011 - 23:25
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page 61

Just like GirlDivers don’t go under the waves without our “life support system”, we shouldn’t go under the rays without a “life support system”. Yes, ladies
(and gentlemen), we’re talking about sun protection. And while sometimes this topic seems over played, hopefully this article will share new information and
remind you of the need for adequate skin care under the sun.

Fitness for technical divers

October 13, 2011 - 23:21
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page 77

There is no such thing as safe technical rebreather diving without proper preparation. But preparation means much more than just checking equipment, going through dive planning and “What-ifs”. It is also a matter of long-term preparation.

And this is just the beginning of the stress you are going to put your body through. You still have to swim to go down, swim on the bottom, swim to go up, on-gas, off-gas, fight against the current and drag off your deco tanks, your bailout tank(s), your huge twinset (the one you nicknamed Potemkin!) or your favourite rebreather, swim at the surface, climb the ladder or the shore and carry everything again! And some people think we do that just for fun!

Locomotion

October 13, 2011 - 23:25
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page 23

The way an animal gets around in the sea and or in the air depends, fundamentally, on the density and viscosity of its milieu.

The Bubbling Reefs

October 13, 2011 - 23:23
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page 84

Imagine a beautiful shallow green water reef with kelp, anemones and sponges among which lots of colourful fauna darting in and out and. Now imagine that the reef is growing on some weird sandstone arches and that the water is fizzy like sparkly mineral water, with bubbles coming out of the reef structure.

As you get closer, you will soon realise that this location is anything but ordinary. The thriving reef is not only full of interesting macro life—in large part thanks to the marine reserve status the area enjoys—but delicate arches and pole-like structures poke out of the sand.

The Perfect Workflow

October 13, 2011 - 23:23
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page 55

Without a proper workflow when doing digital photographing, the quality of your images won’t improve. When all the elements of your photography come together, then you can get the best out of your work. I’ll explain how!

Only when all the different processes of photography come together correctly, can you bring out the best from your images.

The shape of the Hammerhead's head

October 13, 2011 - 23:21
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page 49

Why the peculiar head shape of the hammerhead shark developed as it did has been the subject of much speculation. Few other morphological oddities have inspired so many fanciful and sensible theories about its function as the weirdly shaped head that characterises the hammerhead shark. Recent experimental evidence supports some ideas and refutes others, while pointing to a previously unsuspected role for this peculiar feature.

Vis - Croatia

October 13, 2011 - 23:18
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page 71

If there is any hidden secret in the Mediterranean, it is the island of Vis. For many years, it was a forbidden and restricted military area. It was not until 1991, when the iron curtain finally came down, that it was opened up for tourism and diving. On Vis, small picturesque port towns and spectacular wrecks, drop-offs and caverns are waiting to be discovered by divers.

If there is any hidden secret in the Mediterranean, it is the island of Vis. For many years, it was a forbidden and restricted military area. It was not until 1991, when the iron curtain finally came down, that it was opened up for tourism and diving.

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