Some cope better than others

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Some cope better than others

September 27, 2017 - 18:02
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A new study has found that some marine species will cope with climate change better than others.

The study found that the species most at-risk include the Eastern Australian salmon, yellowbar angelfish, toli shad, sohal surgeonfish and spotted grouper.

After studying more than a thousand fish and shellfish, a study has discovered that 294 of these species will be most at-risk by 2050 as a result of climate change.

The study, by The University of British Columbia, involved using fuzzy logic to create a database examining the long-term vulnerability of marine species that are important to fisheries worldwide. To develop the database, information about the species' biological sensitivity to environmental changes and their projected exposure to changes in the ocean (temperature, oxygen and acidity levels, etc) was considered.

Based on the findings, the researchers found that the species most at-risk include the Eastern Australian salmon, yellowbar angelfish, toli shad, sohal surgeonfish and spotted grouper.

"We hope that this study will highlight the marine species that are most in need of management and conservation actions under climate change," said William Cheung, associate professor in the Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries and director of science for the Nippon Foundation - UBC Nereus Program.

The findings of the study was published in the Global Change Biology journal.

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