Manta Ray

User login

Check the latest uploads

X-Ray Mag #62 - Sep 2014
X-Ray Mag #62 - Sep 2014
X-Ray Mag #62 - Sep 2014
X-Ray Mag #62 - Sep 2014
X-Ray Mag #62 - Sep 2014
X-Ray Mag #62 - Sep 2014
X-Ray Mag #62 - Sep 2014
X-Ray Mag #62 - Sep 2014
Powered by Drupal, an open source content management system
Follow Me on Pinterest

Upcoming dive shows & expos

Shanghai
19 Sep 2014 - 21 Sep 2014
   
   
Birmingham, England
20 Sep 2014 - 21 Sep 2014
   Attending
   
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
17 Nov 2014 - 22 Nov 2014
   Exhibiting
   #1002
Sydney, Australia
14 Mar 2015 - 15 Mar 2015
   Attending
   

Care to comment? See our FaceBook page

Heracleion - the lost Egyptian city revealed after 1,200 years

The lost city found underwater in the Mediterranean Sea is set to be revealed next week in a special television documentary.
Credit:   Photographer: Christoph Gerigk Copyright: Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation
Franck Goddio and divers of his team are inspecting the statue of a pharaoh. The colossal statue is of red granite and measures over 5 metres. It was found close to the big temple of sunken Thonis-Heracleion and reassembled on the site.
Franck Goddio foundation  |  Franck Goddio / Hilti foundation    |   05-02-2013
Known as Heracleion to the ancient Greeks and Thonis to the ancient Egyptians, the city was a port for both civilisations. It was found 6.4 kilometres off the coast of Egypt and 9 metres below the Aboukir Bay in 2000.
share

French underwater archaeologist Dr Frank Goddio's 13-year excavation will be explored in Egypt's Sunken City - A Legend is Revealed, which will air on French and German TV network Channel Arte on May 11.

It was known as early as the 12th century BC but its importance grew during the waning days of the pharaohs, the late period.

Herakleion was Egypt's main port in the time of the pharaohs. It was famous because it was believed that Helen of Troy and Hercules had visited the city, and that the city had even gained its name from Hercules.

The city was rediscovered in 2000 by French underwater archaeologist Dr. Franck Goddio and a team from the European Institute for Underwater Acheology (IEASM) after a four-year geophysical survey.

A new documentary - which will air on French and German TV network Channel Arte on May 11 - highlights the major discoveries that have been unearthed at Thonis-Heracleion during a 13-year excavation. Exciting archeological finds help describe an ancient city that was not only a vital international trade hub but possibly an important religious center.

Advertisements